Tape Ark Launches With Mission To Revolutionise the Way We Store Archive Tape

Tape Ark Launches With Mission To Revolutionise the Way We Store Archive Tape

Perth-based technology start up Tape Ark, founded by serial entrepreneur Guy Holmes, announced today its official launch with an innovative data storage solution which re-imagines the way we approach physical offsite data storage.

Paying money to store tape media in offsite vaults is old school.  It is time to go virtual and get real access to your data.  It's time for Tape Ark. #NoMoreTape #TapeIsDead #TapeZombies

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My New Digital Classroom

My New Digital Classroom

Last week I presented a 20 minute talk at the PPDM luncheon in Perth on technologies that stand to change the future of the geophysical and data management industry. I covered Blockchain, IoT (Internet of things), Hadoop and Watson (IBM’s cognitive computing offering).

I am no expert on these areas, but I have done some casual reading and have taken a general interest in the unfolding of new technologies including things not even remotely related to geophysics, like Uber and Instagram.

 

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Idle Resources

Idle Resources

Who would have thought that people would be willing to pay to sleep on an air mattress in a complete stranger’s house when they are on a business trip? Let’s extend that thinking and really ponder if anyone, even the AirBNB founders themselves, would have thought that their company would be valued at more than any other major hotel chain in the world, despite having almost no real estate of their own?

Uber, of course, has taken the same path. Getting picked up by a complete stranger at 2 am and driven to your home via the kebab shop? I don’t think so. But look who is the largest taxi fleet in the world – and they don’t really even own any taxis!

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Global Technology Trends and Their (Potential) Impact in the Oil Industry

Global Technology Trends and Their (Potential) Impact in the Oil Industry

The technologies that are changing the IT landscape around us often take time to get traction in the oil sector. Sometimes it appears we, as an industry, are so heavily invested in yesterday, that tomorrow is too much to think about. But sometimes revolution does not start within the disquiet, rather it starts next door and spreads into the open arms of disquiet as though it had been waiting for it all the time.

Some ground breaking disruptive technologies that are appearing on the landscape within an array of other industries will at some point seek to pass on their benefits in the oil sector. How long it takes to adopt them is up to us.

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My Digital Twin

My Digital Twin

My digital twin I decided to kick-off 2017 by not going to work anymore. I mean who needs it? Plus I suspect that the team at work would not miss me – well not the actual me anyway. So over the holiday period I created a digital twin that could take my place.

Initially I was not sure that my digital twin (or DT, as I like to call him/her/it) could go to work for me. I mean I do a lot of complex stuff and attend meetings where I am sure I am indispensable. Could my DT actually make it all work?

 

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The Capacity of Speed

The Capacity of Speed

Unbelievable…the amount of data that we can store on a single piece of recording media (disk, tape, thumb drive, etc.) just seems to keep getting larger. Will it ever end? 

For many years, data recording technology in the oil and gas sector has been dominated by IBM. Starting with the development of the 9 track tape in the 1960’s, followed by the closed cartridge technology called 3480 in 1984, IBM has been the leader in the seismic recording industry for as long as I have been alive. 

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The Futurist - Data Storage in the Oil Industry

The Futurist - Data Storage in the Oil Industry

 Has anyone ever seen a “futurist” presentation, or an advertisement to go and see one?  Futurists talk about what things will be like in the future and how cool it will be to be alive when you can fly your car to work.

I attended a Futurist presentation about 3 years ago and they told me that soon data measured in Terabytes would be stored on the back of an amoeba in some kind of holographic storage medium and that we could use our amoeba USB thumb drive to carry our life around in a compact form.  

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The 48 Hour Entrepreneur

The 48 Hour Entrepreneur

It used to be that someone would come up with a good idea and then spend many years, if not a lifetime, trying to commercialise it or to get attention for it. It was a lonely affair and in many ways it seemed that you needed more than just a great idea, you also needed a lot of luck if your idea or invention was to ever see the light of day.

It seems that sometime in the past 10 years someone came up with the ultimate great idea. That idea was to try and create great ideas on a larger scale. Like an idea farm or invention collective of sorts.

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Has the Courier Arrived Yet?

Has the Courier Arrived Yet?

I hear it on an almost daily basis.  I usually stand for it and take it in without comment.  Sometimes, if I am feeling energetic, I will try to correct the person, but usually I let it go in one ear and out the other. It is interesting how we form a belief, and then the longer we believe it, the more closed to the possibility of changing that belief we become.

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The Start of Another Exciting Year

The Start of Another Exciting Year

I settled into my favourite chair, eyes closed, clenching my fists, releasing them slowly, clenching again, releasing slowly. I did the same with my feet repeatedly until I felt warm and as light as a feather. After a few minutes I started to enter a deep state of relaxation.

Before starting this process, I read all of the technology predictions for 2016 from a variety of sources including the Harvard Business Review, Forbes and FurtureTimeLine.net, and stored them away in the back of my mind. Once relaxed, I thought about those predictions and tried to imagine and immerse myself in them fully.

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Quantum Computing Explained (not)

Quantum Computing Explained (not)

On 5 October 2015 Australian engineers at the University of New South Wales
announced that they had built what they have termed a qubit logic gate in silicon
(http://www.engineering.unsw.edu.au/news/quantum-computing-first-two-qubitlogic-gate-in-silicon). This gate makes calculations between two qubits of
information possible for the very first time. Previously engineers had been
unable to make two silicon quantum bits share information, or even talk to each
other.

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Fathers Day

Fathers Day

In my column this month I will once again attempt to walk the thin grey line between what technical readers want to read and what I actually feel like writing about. Being non-technical by nature, I prefer to make fun of ‘technical stuff’ as a way of disguising my lack of intellect. Long integers and simultaneous equations are easy targets, so why not take advantage…right?

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

For the old timers in the industry, the good the bad and the ugly brings up memories of the 1966 Spaghetti Western starring Clint Eastwood. The movie became known for its unique use of long shot and close-up cinematography, as well its distinctive use of violence, tension and stylistic gunfights (kind of sounds like most analyst reports on the oil price).

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What is Master Data Management?

What is Master Data Management?

What is Master Data Management?

I am hearing much about Master Data Management (MDM) from all industry sectors.  Not just oil and gas but commercial organisations, software providers, miners etc. On my quest to be able to talk intelligently about it over dinner with my nerdy database friends, I decided to create “MDM for Dummies”. What follows is not for dummies, but for you – the intelligent and worldly readers of Foundations.

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The Quiet Achievers in the Oil and Gas Industry

The Quiet Achievers in the Oil and Gas Industry

Last year in the October issue of Preview (172), I wrote a column entitled ‘Where has all the data gone?’ It was an article containing a summary about the many changes in the various administrative agencies that have at one time or another had something to do with managing oil and gas exploration data and titles in Australia. In that article I made mention of the newly formed NOTPA and their role in the industry.

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Three Cheers for these Unsung Heroes

Three Cheers for these Unsung Heroes

As a follow-up to my recent post on the SEGY data format entitled "Simple is Not Always Better" - http://www.spectrumdata.com.au/total-data-management-solutions/about-us/news-press-releases/2015/02/13/simple-is-not-always-better---preview-magazine-february-2015 , I want to be clear on how I feel about the role of the SEG in creating these formats so am posting this article written last year.

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Simple is Not Always Better

Simple is Not Always Better

I was thinking through a project I was working on. It was a project where we had taken some raw seismic field data and processed it in readiness for interpretation. Rather amazingly, the completed dataset was 1/600th of its original size when we were finished. I have experienced this kind of reduction in volume every time I have done this sort of work, but this time it struck me as odd.

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Career advice for young geophysicists in a declining market

Career advice for young geophysicists in a declining market

With a column like this called “Data Trends”, it gives me massive carriage to talk on almost any issue I like. The editor of Preview would prefer of course that it has at least some vague reference to geophysics, or science in general, but as long as it is three columns wide, and fills a page, I think I usually meet my target. In the case of this article, I address the overlying “Data Trends” of our fickle industries ups and downs.

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Where Has all the Data Gone?

Where Has all the Data Gone?

In a recent presentation performed at the Professional Petroleum Data Management (PPDM) conference in Perth, I spoke about the problems explorers can have when an exploration area that has previously been out of favour, comes back into fashion.

Like all companies who enter a previously explored area, the first thing they do is assemble as much pre-existing data as possible. On the whole in Australia, the ability to source this data from various public sources is usually quite fruitful. However, whilst getting 90% of the data you need is a great start, it can often be the 10% that you can’t find that will make all the difference to your exploration efforts.

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