My New Digital Classroom

My New Digital Classroom

Last week I presented a 20 minute talk at the PPDM luncheon in Perth on technologies that stand to change the future of the geophysical and data management industry. I covered Blockchain, IoT (Internet of things), Hadoop and Watson (IBM’s cognitive computing offering).

I am no expert on these areas, but I have done some casual reading and have taken a general interest in the unfolding of new technologies including things not even remotely related to geophysics, like Uber and Instagram.

 

Read More

The Start of Another Exciting Year

The Start of Another Exciting Year

I settled into my favourite chair, eyes closed, clenching my fists, releasing them slowly, clenching again, releasing slowly. I did the same with my feet repeatedly until I felt warm and as light as a feather. After a few minutes I started to enter a deep state of relaxation.

Before starting this process, I read all of the technology predictions for 2016 from a variety of sources including the Harvard Business Review, Forbes and FurtureTimeLine.net, and stored them away in the back of my mind. Once relaxed, I thought about those predictions and tried to imagine and immerse myself in them fully.

Read More

Quantum Computing Explained (not)

Quantum Computing Explained (not)

On 5 October 2015 Australian engineers at the University of New South Wales
announced that they had built what they have termed a qubit logic gate in silicon
(http://www.engineering.unsw.edu.au/news/quantum-computing-first-two-qubitlogic-gate-in-silicon). This gate makes calculations between two qubits of
information possible for the very first time. Previously engineers had been
unable to make two silicon quantum bits share information, or even talk to each
other.

Read More

The Quiet Achievers in the Oil and Gas Industry

The Quiet Achievers in the Oil and Gas Industry

Last year in the October issue of Preview (172), I wrote a column entitled ‘Where has all the data gone?’ It was an article containing a summary about the many changes in the various administrative agencies that have at one time or another had something to do with managing oil and gas exploration data and titles in Australia. In that article I made mention of the newly formed NOTPA and their role in the industry.

Read More

Three Cheers for these Unsung Heroes

Three Cheers for these Unsung Heroes

As a follow-up to my recent post on the SEGY data format entitled "Simple is Not Always Better" - http://www.spectrumdata.com.au/total-data-management-solutions/about-us/news-press-releases/2015/02/13/simple-is-not-always-better---preview-magazine-february-2015 , I want to be clear on how I feel about the role of the SEG in creating these formats so am posting this article written last year.

Read More

Simple is Not Always Better

Simple is Not Always Better

I was thinking through a project I was working on. It was a project where we had taken some raw seismic field data and processed it in readiness for interpretation. Rather amazingly, the completed dataset was 1/600th of its original size when we were finished. I have experienced this kind of reduction in volume every time I have done this sort of work, but this time it struck me as odd.

Read More

Career advice for young geophysicists in a declining market

Career advice for young geophysicists in a declining market

With a column like this called “Data Trends”, it gives me massive carriage to talk on almost any issue I like. The editor of Preview would prefer of course that it has at least some vague reference to geophysics, or science in general, but as long as it is three columns wide, and fills a page, I think I usually meet my target. In the case of this article, I address the overlying “Data Trends” of our fickle industries ups and downs.

Read More